produx.todayMarcel Heinze
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My Personal Highlights of A Whole New Mind: Conceptual Age

In the conceptual age, right-brainers will rule the future.

This post is composed out of my personal highlights of A Whole New Mind (2005) written by Daniel H. Pink and distilled by Blinkist.

We move from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age

As we move from the Information Age to the Conceptual Age, Right-Directed Thinking is becoming more and more important.

Our brain has two parts: the left hemisphere for details and the right hemisphere for more holistic, big-picture thinking. Historically, the importance of the right side of the brain and the way of thinking it represents have been undervalued.

Six must-have skills of the future

  • Design
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  • Story
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  • Symphony
    Putting the pieces together is more important than taking them apart.
  • Empathy
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  • Play
    Lightheartedness will likely play an ever more important and beneficial role both at work and outside of work.
  • Meaning
    Now that our material needs are met, we search for meaning, purpose, and fulfillment in life.

Design: In an age of material abundance, the design has become crucial for most modern businesses.

This trend means that product design has become a crucial aspect of businesses. It is no longer enough to produce functional products at a reasonable price; customers demand good design. A good product always trumps fancy marketing strategies.

Research at the London Business School shows that for every percent of sales invested in product design, a company’s sales and profits rise by an average of 3 to 4 percent.

Story: To be successful today, presenting facts is not enough; you must know how to tell stories.

Instead, what is important is an aptitude for the story: the ability to place facts in context and deliver them as a story.

There is even a movement called “organizational storytelling,” where organizations collect the stories their employees tell so that the company has relatable human stories to share. For example, rather than relying solely on manuals to train their technicians, Xerox collects all the stories their technicians tell about repairing machines and passes them on for others to learn from.

Symphony: Putting the pieces together is more important than taking them apart.

The aptitude for symphony also helps people see the big picture instead of the individual parts, which can bring both success and happiness.

This post is composed out of my personal highlights of A Whole New Mind (2005) written by Daniel H. Pink and distilled by Blinkist.

Blinkist takes outstanding nonfiction books and distills their key insights into made-for-mobile book summaries that you can read in just 15 minutes. Learn something new every day – on your smartphone, tablet or PC.


About the book

A Whole New Mind (2005) In an age where computers and well-trained workers from low-paid countries are taking over even white-collar jobs, what can you do to stand out? As we move out of the Information Age and into a new Conceptual Age, the answer is to start embracing the aptitudes associated with the right side of your brain, which was previously thought of as less valuable than analytical left-brain skills.

Daniel H. Pink is an American author of bestselling books on business, management, and work. A Whole New Mind (2005) was a long-running New York Times and BusinessWeek bestseller and has been translated into 20 languages.


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Marcel Heinze
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